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Five Ways Pastors Fail on Facebook.

John Gilman July 18, 2014

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Facebook is everywhere. Pastors can use it to reach people, but here are five ways Pastors Fail on Facebook.

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  1. Liking someone’s picture late at night. Everyone creeps on Facebook, but there’s a difference between creeping and being creepy. Creeping is ok in moderation. You can get to know people and learn how to connect with them. Creepiness is not ok. No one wants an alert at 3:00 am that says their pastor likes a photo of them at the pool from 2008.
  2. Posting only about your church services. Facebook is a social network. Your Facebook account should be about you. It’s not a place to advertise your church. Set up a Facebook page for your church to promote it and your events. If your only post comes at 8:45 on a Sunday morning, people will ignore them, and few people will ever rush to church because of your generic status invitation.
  3. Arguing with strangers on someone else’s status. People post all kinds of interesting and inflammatory things on Facebook, and some of these things are perfect for starting arguments. Some people live to argue online. You’ll never win these types of arguments; they are a waste of time. You can never fully get your point across, and you’ll wind up looking dumb.  If you have to address someone do it in person or use Facebook Messaging.
  4. Complaining about your church. Ministry hurts. Many pastors and their families suffer sheep bites. Pastors who complain about their church on Facebook aren’t winning anyone to their side. You can share good things, but take care to share them in a personal way. Who wants to go to a church that the pastor doesn’t even like?
  5. Friend requesting strangers. Facebook isn’t a place for meeting new people. Don’t expect to win your city through your Facebook account. Only Friend Request people who you actually speak to in real life. It’s fine to accept someone’s request who feels like they know you from your sermons, but you’ll be more effective making friends in real life first.

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